Do Clients Dream of Electric Lawyers?

Do clients dream of electric lawyers?

This program has been accredited by the Law Society for 1.0 Professionalism Hour

When we look into the clouded future some of us see utopias, others see dystopias. One thing is clear, however, and that is: for both good and ill, the future of law will be a technotopia. Lawyers, firmly lodged in the “late adopter” group, by and large experience technology as something outside (their ken, their industry) that keeps happening to them. It’s well past time for lawyers as a group to accept that they need to participate in the shaping of this technotopia if their experience with law is to be at all recognizable in the shape of things to come.

  • Topics to be discussed will include:
  • Trends in technology
  • The smart legal document
  • Technology and access to justice
  • Online dispute resolution

Simon Fodden is Professor Emiritus at Osgoode Hall Law School, where he taught for more than 30 years. He is the Publisher of Slaw (http://www.slaw.ca), Canada’s online legal magazine, which has published daily for seven years.

2 thoughts on “Do Clients Dream of Electric Lawyers?

  1. The US is a common law conurty. This jurisdiction determines that its legal system is an open one, judges would differentiate different facts of the cases and make decisions. China is a civil law conurty. It is a rather closed system in that judges are to interpret the codes. The civil law system itself provides less flexibility and more certainty, while the common law system is on the opposite.Also, China is still at rule by law stage, where law is an instrument and at the service of the state, where as the US is a rule of law conurty, where the laws are at the services of everyone, including the state. Typically, judges in a rule of law society take a very big role.Another reason why there are so many lawsuits in the US is contingent fees. In the US, lawyers can work on this basis, ie they do not get paid unless they win the case, and if they are successful, they may get up to 1/3 of the award. I’m not sure whether this exists in China.

  2. Pingback: LawTechCamp 2012 | My Support Calculator

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